Washington Brothers Get Fall Trial

Suspects accused in 2011 Columbia Heights assault get Oct. 15 trail date after long delay

The two brothers accused of assaulting five women – some of whom identified as lesbians – in Columbia Heights in July 2011 will go to trial this fall, D.C. Superior Court Judge Herbert B. Dixon Jr. decided at a June 21 status hearing. Trial was originally scheduled for Nov. 7, 2011.

Christian Washington, facing charges of bias-related simple assault and bias-related threats to do bodily harm, and Dalonte Washington, facing charges of simple assault, have been scheduled for a jury trial on Oct. 15 for allegedly attacking the women after they rebuffed their advances.

According to charging documents, the brothers followed a group of women walking on 14th St NW from a 7-11 store to the Columbia Heights Metro Station. The men allegedly harassed some of the women, physically assaulting them after one woman told the two men they were not interested because they were lesbians.

At that point, Christian Washington said, according to the charging document: ”You fucking dyke bitches, I will kick that dyke bitches (sic) ass, I will take that dyke bitch into the alley and kick her ass.” The brothers then allegedly assaulted the women.

In May, Dixon issued a bench warrant for Dalonte Washington – who is being held in Virginia after pleading guilty to unrelated charges in Arlington County Court – after he failed to appear for a pretrial status hearing. He remains held in Virginia as he awaits trial for charges in the Oct. 15 incident.

Christian Washington has been released on a two-year probation after pleading guilty in September to receiving stolen property and assaulting a police officer, according to court records.

The assault on the group of women garnered headlines after it was revealed that Metropolitan Police Department officers who initially responded to the scene had failed to file a report or make arrests, prompting an angry response from the local LGBT community and an internal MPD investigation.

Dennis Braddock, attorney for Christian Washington, has asked for information on that internal investigation. He also asked for written documents and evidence regarding the charges against his client, as well as information about the victims, witnesses and informants in the assault, and information on potential drug or alcohol use by any of those parties.

That information, also known as Brady information, could potentially be used to prove innocence or call into question the credibility of government witnesses. Dorsey Jones, attorney for Dalonte Washington, asked for similar information.

These requests, as well as the prosecuting attorney being replaced, led to the delay.

John Riley is the local news reporter for Metro Weekly. He can be reached at jriley@metroweekly.com