Out On the Town: D.C. Arts & Entertainment Calendar

Films, theaters, plays, live music, art galleries and more events in Washington and nearby Maryland and Virginia


FILM

CAPTAIN AMERICA: CIVIL WAR
Set after the events of Avengers: Age of Ultron, this is essentially Marvel's version of Batman v Superman, as Captain America faces off against Iron Man when politicians start demanding greater oversight of the Avengers program. Naturally, as with all of these films, their conflict will be resolved when an even bigger threat rears its ugly head -- plus, they both need to get on board for Avengers: Infinity War in 2018. Disney's bank balance is counting on it. Opens Friday, May 6. Area theaters. Visit fandango.com. (Rhuaridh Marr)

HOLLYWOOD ON TRIAL
This season's "Seeing Red Film Series" at the Hill Center, with hosts New Yorker staff writer Margaret Talbot and movie critic Nell Minow, continues with 1947's Body and Soul, a classic parable of temptation, corruption and redemption set in the gritty world of boxing and inspired by the real-life story of fighter Barney Ross. Left-wing actor John Garfield stars along with the soon-to-be blacklisted Anne Revere, who plays Ross' mother. This is the rare pre-1960s film treating an African-American character, played by Canada Lee, with dignity and respect. The film is also noted for its noir cinematography by James Wong Howe and Oscar-nominated screenplay by Abraham Polonsky. Sunday, May 8, at 4 p.m. Hill Center, Old Navy Hospital, 921 Pennsylvania Ave. SE. Free. Call 202-549-4172 or visit HillCenterDC.org.

THE MAN WHO KNEW INFINITY
Matthew Brown directs Dev Patel starring as the real-life Srinivasa Ramanjuan, a poor Indian mathematician who pioneered theories at Cambridge University during World War I. Jeremy Irons, Stephen Fry, Jeremy Northam and Toby Jones also star in this British biopic based on Robert Kanigel's 1991 book of the same name. Opens Friday, May 6. Area theaters. Visit fandango.com.


STAGE

110 IN THE SHADE
Marcia Milgrom Dodge directs and choreographs a new production of this old-fashioned musical, set during a sweltering Texas summer in the mid-1950s and featuring a lively score from the creators of The Fantasticks. The focus is on a self-proclaimed rainmaker who promises to reverse fortunes in the drought-stricken town, to say nothing of its leading spinster, played by Tracy Lynn Olivera. To May 14. Ford's Theatre, 511 10th St. NW. Tickets are $28 to $69. Call 800-982-2787 or visit fordstheatre.org.

BLACK PEARL SINGS!
Over 20 American folk and spiritual songs factor into Frank Higgins' story inspired by the real-life discovery of Huddie "Lead Belly" Ledbetter by folklorist John Lomax. Sandra Holloway directs this MetroStage production featuring Roz White as Alberta "Pearl" Johnson and Teresa Castracane as Susannah Mullally. To May 29. MetroStage, 1201 North Royal St., Alexandria. Tickets are $55. Call 800-494-8497 or visit metrostage.org.

BROUHAHA
Local theater company Happenstance Theater presents another run of its devised clown-esque piece focused on an ensemble of eccentrics on the precipice at the end of the world. Happenstance co-founders and married team Sabrina Mandell and Mark Jaster direct and perform among the cast. "What we actually do, nobody is doing ...and it's hard to describe," Mandell told Metro Weekly two years ago. Each devised theater show is built from scratch by the entire ensemble, working as a collective from script start to finished performance. Opens Thursday, May 5, at 8 p.m. To May 22. Baltimore Theatre Project, 45 West Preston St. Baltimore. Tickets are $22. Call 410-752-8558 or visit happenstancetheater.com.

CAROLINE, OR CHANGE
Virginia's fledgling theater company Creative Cauldron presents a production of Tony Kushner and Jeanine Tesori's coming-of-age musical set in racially and politically charged 1960s Louisiana. Now in previews. Opening Night is Saturday, May 7, at 8 p.m. To May 29. ArtSpace Falls Church, 410 South Maple Ave. in Falls Church. Tickets are $26, or $50 for opening night. Call 703-436-9948 or visit creativecauldron.org.

CHRONICLE OF A DEATH FORETOLD
Gabriel Garcia Marquez's novella is the source for another stage adaptation, though this time as a straight play, unlike the 1995 Tony-nominated musical. Jose Zayas directs GALA Theatre's production of the tale about a murderous mission of revenge by a band of brothers in Colombia, adapted by Jorge Triana and performed in Spanish with English surtitles. Closes this Sunday, May 8. GALA Theatre at Tivoli Square, 3333 14th St. NW. Tickets are $20 to $42. Call 202-234-7174 or visit galatheatre.org.

DETROIT '67
Center Stage offers a production of Dominique Morisseau's sharp-eyed drama about racial and generational differences during the riots of the Motown era. Kamilah Forbes directs this co-production with Detroit Public Theatre and offered at Towson University, while Center Stage renovates its downtown Baltimore venue. Closes this Sunday, May 8. Mainstage at Towson University's Center for the Arts, 1 Fine Arts Dr., Towson, Md. Tickets are $10 to $59. Call 410-986-4000 or visit centerstage.org.

DISGRACED
Arena Stage offers a production of Avad Akhtar's Pulitzer Prize-winning incendiary examination of one's self and one's beliefs -- of American identity and South Asian culture. Timothy Douglas directs Felicia Curry, Joe Isenberg, Nehal Joshi, Samip Raval and Ivy Vahanian. To May 29. Kreeger Theater in the Mead Center for American Theater, 1101 6th St. SW. Call 202-488-3300 or visit arenastage.org.

EMPEROR'S NIGHTINGALE
Adventure Theatre MTC presents a re-imagining of the Hans Christian Anderson fairytale about an aimless prince who ultimately becomes king. Natsu Onoda Power directs Damon Chua's adaptation. To May 30. Adventure Theatre MTC, 7300 MacArthur Blvd., Glen Echo. Tickets are $19. Call 301-634-2270 or visit adventuretheatre-mtc.org.

HUGO BALL: A SUPER SPECTACULAR DADA ADVENTURE
A one-of-a-kind performance loosely based on the life of one of the founders of the Dada anti-art movement. Pointless Theatre Company's latest experimental, multi-disciplinary puppet theater piece explores art, love and faith -- and contains "puppet sexuality, profanity and violence." To May 14. Logan Fringe Arts Space's Trinidad Theatre, 1358 Florida Ave. NE. Tickets are $20 to $25. Call 202-733-6321 or visit pointlesstheatre.com.

JOURNEY TO THE WEST
Constellation Theatre Company's Allison Arkell Stockman directs the fanciful global tale adapted by Mary Zimmerman from an ancient Chinese novel about a Buddhist monk who travels in search of sacred scriptures, meeting a monkey, a pig, a river monster and a monk along the way. Tom Teasley returns to Constellation to provide his percussive-based world music style of live accompaniment. To May 22. Source Theatre, 1835 14th St. NW. Tickets are $35 to $45. Call 202-204-7741 or visit constellationtheatre.org.

PHAETON
Taffety Punk Theater Company, whose tagline is "We Will Rock You" and styles itself as a theatrical rock band, presents Michael Milligan's retelling of the classic Greek myth, exploring the failure of society to live up to the promise of its visionaries and the repercussions of that failure. Marcus Kyd directs a large cast featuring company members Dan Crane and Helen Hayes Award-winner Kimberly Gilbert and James Flanagan in the title role, with choreography by Kelly King. Opens Saturday, May 7, at 7:30 p.m. To May 28. Capitol Hill Arts Workshop, 545 7th St. SE. Tickets are $15. Call 202-547-6839 or visit taffetypunk.com.

PROOF
Alex Levy directs actors Katrina Clark, Ray Ficca, Sam Ludwig and Liz Osborn in Virginia's 1st Stage production of David Auburn's 2001 Pulitzer Prize winner. Closes Sunday, May 8. 1st Stage, 1524 Spring Hill Rd. Tysons, Va. Tickets are $30, or $200 for 2016 1st Stage benefit performance on Friday, May 6, which includes food and drink and starts at 6 p.m. Call 703-854-1856 or visit 1ststagetysons.org.

THE BODY OF AN AMERICAN
Theater J presents the regional premiere of Dan O'Brien's breathtakingly provocative drama, based on a true story, about the friendship that develops between a playwright and a photographer and traverses Rwanda, Afghanistan and the Canadian Arctic. Jose Carrasquillo directs a production featuring Eric Hissom and Thomas Keegan. Pride Night is Thursday, May 12, at 7:30 p.m. Runs to May 22. The Aaron and Cecile Goldman Theater, Washington, D.C.'s Jewish Community Center, 1529 16th St. NW. Call 202-777-3210 or visit theaterj.org.

THE ELECTRIC BABY
Known for ambitious stagings of eccentric or out-there tales, Rorschach Theatre presents Stefanie Zadravec's lyrical play exploring the theme of loss with humor and folklore. Reviewing another production, a critic for the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette was both "charmed" and "enthralled" by "its delicacy and its strength." Randy Baker directs a production featuring William Aitken, J. Shawn Durham, Jennifer J. Hopkins, Cam Magee, Kiernan McGowan and Sarah Taurchini. To May 15. Atlas Performing Arts Center, 1333 H St. NE. Tickets are $15 to $30. Call 202-399-7993 or visit atlasarts.org.

THE MYSTERY OF LOVE & SEX
Signature Theatre offers this play from Bathsheba Doran, a writer better known for his work on premium cable, from HBO's Boardwalk Empire and Showtime's Masters of Sex. The Mystery of Love & Sex is an unexpected story of an evolving friendship between a man and a woman, who aren't quite straight and aren't quite in love with each other -- but they consider romance anyway, for the sake of the parents. Closes Sunday, May 8. Signature Theatre, 4200 Campbell Ave., Arlington. Call 703-820-9771 or visit signature-theatre.org.

TRANSMISSION
A three-year-old D.C.-based playwriting collective, and one of this year's Helen Hayes Award winners as Outstanding Emerging Theatre Company, the Welders offers its latest production, an immersive, participatory "performance play" written and performed by Gwydion Suilebhan. Devised for a small audience of 20 people, all seated in 1930s armchairs clustered around period radios, Transmission focuses on the viral evolution of culture, from the radio age to the present day. Touted as part-jazz, part-science lecture and part-"ritual invocation", the show investigates what it means to be inundated in our always-connected, always-sharing culture, which demands skepticism and inquisitiveness. To May 28. Atlas Performing Arts Center, 1333 H St. NE. Tickets are $15 to $30. Call 202-399-7993 or visit atlasarts.org.

WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE'S LONG LOST FIRST PLAY (ABRIDGED)
The Reduced Shakespeare Company returns to Folger Theatre with this world premiere written and directed by two of the world's most famous Shakespearean comedians, Austin Tichenor and Reed Martin, who throw themselves into a funny, punny physical frenzy. Joining Tichenor and Martin to perform the work as a comedic trio is Teddy Spencer. Closes Sunday, May 8. Folger Theatre, 201 East Capitol St. SE. Tickets are $35 to $75. Call 202-544-7077 or visit folger.edu.


MUSIC

AMERICAN POPS ORCHESTRA WITH ERIK ALTEMUS, NOVA PEYTON
Local musical theater performers Nicholas Rodriguez and Hayley Travers are guests for "Make Someone Happy," a concert featuring show tunes and pop songs from the 1960s. Mark Frazier closes out the inaugural season of this local orchestra with headliners Erik Altemus, best known for playing Lewis in the recent revival of Pippin on Broadway, and Nova Peyton, the local Helen Hayes Award-winning powerhouse. Friday, May 6, at 8 p.m. GW Lisner, The George Washington University, 730 21st St. NW. Tickets are $35 to $65. Call 202-994-6851 or visit lisner.org.

ARTURO SANDOVAL
A protégé of the legendary jazz master Dizzy Gillespie, the Cuban-born Sandoval was granted political asylum in the U.S. decades ago. He's revered as one of the world's best jazz trumpeters and flugelhorn players, as well as a renowned pianist and composer. Thursday, May 5, through Sunday, May 8, at 8 p.m. and 10 p.m. Blues Alley, 1073 Wisconsin Ave. NW. Tickets are $50 to $55, plus $10 minimum purchase. Call 202-337-4141 or visit bluesalley.com.

CAPITAL CITY SYMPHONY
"Great Masters, Young Stars" features Beethoven's Symphony No. 6 in F Major and Brahms' Violin Concerto in D Major, the latter performed with Lara Boschkor, the winner of the Johansen International Competition. Sunday, May 8, at 5 p.m. Atlas Performing Arts Center, 1333 H St. NE. Tickets are $15 to $25. Call 202-399-7993 or visit atlasarts.org.

CANTATE CHAMBER SINGERS
Live at 10th and G presents the third concert of the season by this local ensemble. " Patterns and Lines" is a multimedia composition celebrating the work of world-traveling photographers Judy and Wayne Guenther, with poetry by Roberto Ifill and music by Andrew Earle Simpson. Also on the bill are works by Samuel Barber and John Corigliano. Saturday, May 14, at 7:30 p.m. Live! at 10th and G, 945 G ST. NW. Tickets are $35, or $45 for premium seating. Call 202-628-4317 or visit facebook.com/liveat10thandg.

CHOPTEETH
The Washington Post has called this 12-piece band "a storming powerhouse of big-band African funk ... smart, tight and relentlessly driving." Chopteeth has already won a number of Washington Area Music Association Awards -- otherwise known as Wammies, including the Artist of the Year accolade in 2008. And now the Afrobeat-driven group returns to Strathmore's cabaret venue. Saturday, May 14, at 8 p.m. Amp by Strathmore, 11810 Grand Park Ave. North Bethesda. Tickets are $20 to $30. Call 301-581-5100 or visit ampbystrathmore.com.

GAY MEN'S CHORUS OF WASHINGTON WITH GALLIM DANCE
Everybody's favorite local chorus group celebrates 35 years of singing for equality with a retrospective concert at the Kennedy Center. The first half of the evening offers Carl Orff's springtime masterpiece Carmina Burana. Thea Kano will lead the chorus and additional singers from the New York City Master Chorale in a performance of the work, and acclaimed Brooklyn-based company Gallim Dance will make its Kennedy Center debut with a new work as part of the program. Sunday, May 8, at 8 p.m. Kennedy Center Concert Hall. Tickets are $25 to $81. Call 202-467-4600 or visit kennedy-center.org.

ITZHAK PERLMAN AND EMANUEL AX
Washington Performing Arts presents a concert by two celebrated statesmen of classical music, touring in support of a new Deutsche Grammophon recording of Faure and Strauss violin sonatas. This is the rescheduled date for the concert, originally scheduled in September but postponed due to Perlman's emergency gallbladder surgery. Tuesday, May 10, at 7 p.m. Kennedy Center Concert Hall. Tickets are $55 to $135. Call 202-467-4600 or visit kennedy-center.org.

THE CHORAL ARTS SOCIETY WITH RENEE FLEMING, NORM LEWIS
Scott Tucker helps the full 190-member-strong Choral Arts Society of Washington celebrate the American musical -- specifically the output of Rodgers and Hammerstein, with "Some Enchanted Evening." Renee Fleming, American opera superstar dubbed "the people's diva," and Norm Lewis, the Tony-nominated Broadway baritone (The Gershwins' Porgy & Bess) join to sing through the hits. Sunday, May 15, at 8 p.m. Kennedy Center Concert Hall. Tickets are $25 to $94. Call 202-467-4600 or visit kennedy-center.org.

THE RE-LIVES: A TRIBUTE TO LUTHER VANDROSS
William "Smooth" Wardlaw, said to be the spitting image and sound of the man known as "The Velvet Voice," will lead this tribute performance to the late R&B superstar. Friday, May 6, at 8 p.m. Amp by Strathmore, 11810 Grand Park Ave. North Bethesda. Tickets are $25 to $35. Call 301-581-5100 or visit ampbystrathmore.com.

X AMBASSADORS
After opening for Muse at the Verizon Center in January, the upstate New York quartet returns to town to offer another round of its emotional, bluesy, syncopated chants ("Renegades," "Hang On," "Nervous") that you've no doubt heard in commercials. Maybe you've seen images of the band's lead singer Sam Harris, whose as easy on the eyes -- bald and bearded -- as his voice is on the ears. Los Angeles-based dance-pop provocateur Robert DeLong opens along with Sara Hartman. Thursday, May 12, at 7 p.m. Echostage, 2135 Queens Chapel Rd. NE. Tickets are $35. Call 202-503-2330 or visit echostage.com.


DANCE

CITYDANCE'S DREAMSCAPE
CityDance presents its annual gala performance co-produced with Rasta Thomas, in which Thomas and dancers with the CityDance Conservatory and students from its Dream program appear alongside guest artists: Matthew Golding of the Royal Ballet, Anna Tsygankova of the Dutch National Ballet, Pete Walker of Aspen Santa Fe Ballet, Anna Gerberich of the Joffrey Ballet, Cartier Williams Dance Theatre, Gallim Dance and more. Saturday, May 7, at 8 p.m. Lincoln Theatre, 1215 U St. NW. Tickets are $25 to $38. Call 202-328-6000 or visit citydance.net.


COMEDY

JANINE BRITO
Touted as a rising star on the San Francisco scene, this lesbian comic offers "a sarcastic, snarky smart bomb of comedy funk straight from the '80s." Thursday, May 12, at 9 p.m., Friday, May 13, at 9 p.m. and 11 p.m., and Saturday, May 14, at 7 p.m. Drafthouse Comedy, 1100 13th St. NW. Tickets are $25. Call 202-750-6411 or visit drafthousecomedy.com.

JULIA SCOTTI AND KEVIN MEANEY
A night of "Out-standing comedy" featuring transgender comedian Julia Scotti and Kevin Meaney, a stand-up comic and actor from both TV and Broadway -- rescheduled after Snowzilla postponed the debut at Amp by Strathmore. Friday, May 13, at 8 p.m. Amp by Strathmore, 11810 Grand Park Ave. North Bethesda. Tickets are $20 to $30. Call 301-581-5100 or visit ampbystrathmore.com.

WILL DURST, BOB NELSON, MAUREEN LANGAN
Wolf Trap closes out the winter season in the Barns with its 29th Annual Evening of Comedy featuring stand-up. Friday, May 6, at 8 p.m., and Saturday, May 7, at 7 p.m. and 9:30 p.m. The Barns at Wolf Trap, 1635 Trap Road, Vienna. Tickets are $25 to $28. Call 703-255-1900 or visit wolftrap.org.


READINGS

ANGELA DUCKWORTH
Grit: The Power of Passion and Perseverance offers insights from decades of research into why some people succeed and others fail at tasks from the MacArthur "genius grant" recipient. The answer, essentially, is not talent, but a special blend of drive and determination. Tuesday, May 10, at 7 p.m. Sixth & I Historic Synagogue. 600 I St. NW. Tickets are $16 for one ticket, or $30 for ticket with one book, or $40 for two tickets and a book. Call 202-408-3100 or visit sixthandi.org.


GALLERIES

A COLLECTOR'S VISION: WASHINGTONIANA COLLECTION
In addition to incorporating the Textile Museum, the recently opened George Washington University Museum also houses the Albert H. Small Washingtoniana Collection. The exhibition A Collector's Vision serves as a perfect introduction to the collection, featuring maps and prints, rare letters, photographs and drawings documenting the history of Washington, D.C. and donated by Small in 2011. Ongoing. The George Washington University Museum, 701 21st St. NW. Call 202-994-5200 or visit museum.gwu.edu.

ART OF THE AIRPORT TOWER
The images of Smithsonian photographer Carolyn Russo offer a journey examining contemporary and historic air traffic control towers in this exhibition at the Air and Space Museum. Through November. National Air and Space Museum, Independence Ave at 6th St. SW. Call 202-633-2214 or visit airandspace.si.edu.

EXPLORING YELLOWSTONE'S GREAT ANIMAL MIGRATIONS
Part of the National Park Service's centennial celebration. This Invisible Boundaries exhibition, in conjunction with the May issue of National Geographic, uses stunning photographs, immersive video, interactive migration maps, cultural objects, and original artwork to explore the compelling story behind some of the most amazing animal migrations on the planet. To Sept. 30. National Geographic Museum, 1145 17th St. NW. Free. Call 202-857-7588 or visit ngmuseum.org.

EYE POP: THE CELEBRITY GAZE
Many never publicly displayed portraits of 53 luminaries at the top in their fields is the focus of this exhibition at the National Portrait Gallery. Oprah Winfrey, Brad Pitt, Katy Perry, Sonia Sotomayor, Michelle Obama, Serena Williams and Kobe Bryant are among the works, ranging from drawings to sculpture, paintings to video portraits, and all recent additions to the museum's collection. Through July 10. National Portrait Gallery, 8th and F Streets. NW. Call 202-633-8300 or visit npg.si.edu.

KONSTANTIN MAKOVSKY: THE TSAR'S PAINTER
The Hillwood Museum presents a special exhibition on the 19th Century Russian painter who captured the color, romance and extravagance of the feudal Russian elite. Konstantin Makovsky's A Boyar Wedding Feast will serve as the exhibition centerpiece, with exquisite objects and details from the painting brought to life through groupings of 17th Century objects drawn from Hillwood's collection, as well as loans from other museums including the Met and Baltimore's Walters museums. Through June 12. Hillwood Estate, 4155 Linnean Ave. NW. Suggested donation is $12. Call 202-686-5807 or visit HillwoodMuseum.org.

LUMINOUS LANDSCAPES: PHOTOGRAPHS BY ALAN WARD
The National Building Museum offers an exhibition focused on large-format photographs, mostly in black and white, by Alan Ward, a renowned practitioner of both landscape architecture and photography. Ward has combined his dual interests in these works, visually deconstructing the fundamental elements of the landscape in stunning ways. The museum also displays some of his photography equipment and large-format cameras. Through Sept. 5. National Building Museum, 401 F St. NW. Call 202-272-2448 or visit nbm.org.

ONE LIFE: DOLORES HUERTA
The National Portrait Gallery offers its first exhibition devoted to a Latino figure. Dolores Heurta co-founded the National Farm Workers Association with Cesar Chavez in 1962 and fought for the passage of the California Agricultural Labor Relations Act of 1975. Taina Caragol curated an exhibition that vividly traces the 13 years between those two actions. Through May 15. National Portrait Gallery, 8th and F Streets. NW. Call 202-633-8300 or visit npg.si.edu.

OUT OF THE ASHES
Subtitled New Library for Congress and the Nation, this exhibition marks the 200th anniversary of the acquisition of Jefferson's library of books, the foundation of the modern Library of Congress. The Jeffersonian concept of a universal library covering all subjects is the basis of the library's comprehensive collecting policies. Through May. Second Floor of the Library of Congress's Thomas Jefferson Building, 10 First St. SE. Call 202-707-8000 or visit loc.gov.

RE-BALL!: RAISE/RAZE IN THE DUPONT UNDERGROUND
The long-shuttered, former streetcar station -- and one-time food court -- below Dupont Circle reopens after two decades. This site-specific installation features the 650,000 translucent plastic balls from last summer's Beach exhibit at the National Building Museum. The New York architecture and design studio Hou de Sousa has assembled them into a fully reconfigurable block system -- like sand in a giant sandbox -- that visitors are encouraged to refashion into their own objects and spaces. To June 1. The Dupont Underground, Dupont Circle NW. Admission by reservation only, with priority given to those who donate $25 to the Indiegogo campaign Open These Doors. Due to the interactive nature of the installation, small groups only. Visit dupontunderground.org.

RENWICK GALLERY: WONDER
As part of the immersive exhibition Wonder, nine leading contemporary artists, including Gabriel Dawe, Patrick Dougherty and Maya Lin, have each taken over different galleries in the newly renovated Renwick Gallery, the first building in the U.S. designed expressly as an art museum. Through July 10. Renwick Gallery, Pennsylvania Avenue at 17th Street NW. Free. Call 202-633-1000 or visit renwick.americanart.si.edu.

SEEING NATURE: LANDSCAPE MASTERWORKS
Microsoft co-founder Paul G. Allen has organized an exhibition with several museums to display the 39 masterpieces from his family's collection exploring the evolution of European and American landscape art. Spanning five centuries, the exhibition features works, among others, by Jan Brueghel, Claude Monet, Paul Cezanne, Gustav Klimt, Georgia O'Keeffe, Edward Hopper and David Hockney. Closes Sunday, May 8. The Phillips Collection, 1600 21st St. NW. Tickets $12. Call 202-387-2151 x247 or visit phillipscollection.org.

STORIES OF MIGRATION: CONTEMPORARY ARTISTS INTERPRET DIASPORA
The George Washington University Museum presents this extremely timely juried and invitational exhibition, through which 44 artists share personal and universal stories of migration. Through Sept. 4. The George Washington University Museum, 701 21st St. NW. Call 202-994-5200 or visit museum.gwu.edu.

THE BIG HOPE SHOW
Baltimore's American Visionary Art Museum offers its 21st annual exhibition, featuring over 25 artists offering works in various media that champion the radiant and transformative power of hope. It's an original and unabashedly idealistic exhibition, curated by Rebecca Alban Hoffberger, founder and director of this original and unabashedly unusual 20-year-old museum. Through Sept. 4. American Visionary Art Museum, 800 Key Highway. Baltimore. Tickets are $15.95, or $20 for the preview party. Call 410-244-1900 or visit avam.org.

THE GREAT INKA ROAD: ENGINEERING AN EMPIRE
One of the monumental engineering achievements in history, the Great Inka Road is a network of more than 20,000 miles, crossing mountains and tropical lowlands, rivers and deserts, linking the Inca capital Cusco with the farthest reaches of its empire -- and it still serves Andean communities today in Colombia, Ecuador, Peru, Bolivia, Argentina and Chile. This exhibition explores the legacy of the Inka Empire and technological feat of the road, recognized by the United Nations as a World Heritage site in 2014. Through April 2018. National Museum of the American Indian, Independence Avenue at 4th Street SW. Call 202-633-1000 or visit nmai.si.edu.

THE OUTWIN 2016: AMERICAN PORTRAITURE TODAY
Every three years the Smithsonian's National Portrait Gallery presents finalists of the Outwin Boochever Portrait Competition, named for a late volunteer and benefactor. The portraits are works drawn from all over America, mostly featuring unheralded, everyday citizens and generally presented in innovative ways through various media, from standard photography to three-dimensional installation. This year's winner is a stunning, slightly surreal painting of a young African-American girl by Amy Sherald of Baltimore. Among the 43 finalists, more than a half-dozen are LGBT-themed, including: Jess T. Dugan of St. Louis and her masculine self-portrait; a print of two transgender teenagers in love by Evan Baden of Oregon; an oil painting focused on a recently married, older gay couple by Paul Oxborough of Minnesota; and a flamboyant, patriotic painting by D.C.'s Tim Doud featuring his spouse, cultural theorist Edward Ingebretsen, in full plume. Through Jan. 8. National Portrait Gallery, 8th and F Streets. NW. Call 202-633-8300 or visit npg.si.edu.

TWISTED TEENAGE PLOT
Named after the band featuring artist Kevin MacDonald, the Apler Initiative for Washington Art offers this exhibition at the American University Museum showcasing other local visual artists who also played in bands in the late '70s and early '80s. Represented in the exhibition -- which includes sound recordings, posters and videos -- are Dick Bangham, Michael Baron, Jay Burch, Kim Kane, Clark Vinson Fox (aka Michael Clark), Steve Ludlum, Michael McCall, JW Mahoney, Michael Reidy, Robin Rose, Judith Watkins Tartt and Joe White. Through May 29. American University Museum's Gallery 252 at the Katzen Arts Center, 4400 Massachusetts Ave. NW. Call 202-885-1300 or visit american.edu/cas/museum.

WINDOW TO WASHINGTON
Window to Washington: The Kiplinger Collection at HSW is an exhibition at Washington's Carnegie Library that traces the development of the nation's capital from a sleepy Southern town to a modern metropolis, as documented through the works of artists. The Historical Society of Washington, D.C., exhibition was made possible by a donation from the Kiplinger family. It's also an early step in a reorganization effort by the society, which has struggled to revive ever since its short-lived effort a decade ago to run a City Museum of Washington proved too ambitious. Open Tuesdays through Fridays from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The Historical Society of Washington, D.C., at the Carnegie Library, 801 K St. NW. Call 202-393-1420 or visit dchistory.org.


ABOVE AND BEYOND

LA-TI-DO
Regie Cabico and Don Mike Mendoza's La-Ti-Do variety show is neither karaoke nor cabaret. The show features higher-quality singing than most karaoke, often from local musical theater actors performing on their night off. Cabico and co-host Mendoza also select storytellers who offer spoken-word poetry and comedy. Held at Bistro Bistro in Dupont Circle, the next La-Ti-Do event features local musical theater actor Ian Anthony Coleman, who has appeared recently in Arena Stage's Oliver!, Keegan Theatre's American Idiot and Hair! and Creative Cauldron's Once On This Island. Coleman will be joined by Kristin Cardinal, Reavey Burke and the Alexandria Singers. Monday, May 9, at 8 p.m. Bistro Bistro, 1727 Connecticut Ave. NW. Tickets are $15, or $10 if you eat dinner at the restaurant beforehand. Call 202-328-1640 or visit latidodc.wix.com/latido.

GERARD PANGAUD: CLASSIC FRENCH COOKING
The man behind the former D.C. restaurant Gerard's Place and now chef at Malmaison on the Georgetown Waterfront, Gerard Pangaud was the youngest chef ever to receive a two-star Michelin rating (for his namesake French restaurant prior to moving to the U.S.). At the Hill Center on Capitol Hill he offers another Art of French Cooking class, predicated on his approach in the kitchen emphasizing the creative and unique over the rote and standard -- in other words, winging it versus relying on a recipe. For this class Pangaud demonstrates how to make a bouillabaisse of monkfish "Marseillaise," crispy sweetbread with wild mushrooms and roasted garlic sauce, and a tart crumble with rhubarb and strawberries. Saturday, May 14, at 11 a.m. Hill Center, Old Navy Hospital, 921 Pennsylvania Ave. SE. Cost is $85. Call 202-549-4172 or visit HillCenterDC.org.