Metro Weekly

“2,000 Miles: Divided Land, Common Humanity” plots the original US-Mexico border

Marcos Ramírez Erre and David Taylor show the U.S. and Mexico's complicated but shared history

Deliminations — Photos: Courtesy Marcos Ramírez ERRE and David Taylor

Organized in conjunction with the Goethe-Institut and its exhibit 2,000 Miles: Divided Land, Common Humanity featuring multimedia narratives and satellite imagery of the U.S.-Mexico border, this exhibit presented by the Embassy of Mexico documents a 2,400-mile-long, site-specific art installation tracing the border that existed between Mexico and the United States in 1821.

Today that boundary, developed two decades before Mexico ceded a large chunk of territory including much of what became the American West, only exists on paper in the form of documents and antique maps. By making that border visible through their installation, artists Marcos Ramírez Erre and David Taylor show what Mexico lost and highlight the fact that the U.S. and Mexico have a complicated but shared history and common interests. They suggest that erecting a border wall, for instance, would threaten that.

Through Jan. 28. Mexican Cultural Institute, 2829 16th St. NW. Visit instituteofmexicodc.org.

Deliminations — Photos: Courtesy Marcos Ramírez ERRE and David Taylor

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Doug Rule covers the arts, theater, music, food, nightlife and culture as contributing editor for Metro Weekly.